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Tag: wedding invitation cards

Customizing Your Wedding Response Cards

If you are planning to send out wedding invitations, make sure to add a response card for your guests. This card provides an easy way for guests to respond to your invitation. It is part of the etiquette of giving a formal response to the bride and groom. However, the response card can be customized to meet your wedding needs. From the request line to the date of reply, learn more about the organization of a wedding response card by reading our blog!

Request Line

The first line on the card is to address the guests by formally requesting a reply. Some phrasing you might see on this section of the card include “the favor of a response is requested by”, “kindly reply by”, and “please respond by”. If you plan to use formal or casual phrasing, ensure you are consistent with your speech throughout the card.

Date of Reply

The next line of the card is to reach a final head count for the wedding. Responses should be requested at least two to four weeks before the actual date. Follow-ups may be necessary if you don’t receive a response. The date of reply is important not only for head count, but also if you plan on having catering services and need to know the number of people to serve.

“M” Line

The M line is for guests to write in their names. The M itself is meant to designate a salutation for Mr., Mrs., Miss, or Ms. Couples can choose to write in Name(s) instead of the M.

Accept and Decline Lines

The last line of the response card has an accept and decline line for guests. The wording for this line can range from “accepts with pleasure/declines with regret” to “will attend/ will not attend”. This depends on the formality of the card. Another line might be added for the number of attendees, usually for larger families.

Conclusion

At Forever Friends, we have beautiful response cards and envelopes to be included with your wedding invitation. Our response cards and envelopes are customizable. Contact us to order your response cards today!

History of Wedding Invitation Design

Wedding invitations didn’t always contain pop-up flowers or the words “Mr. and Mrs.” in embossed letters. To dive into the fascinating story of how wedding invitations changed through the ages, we must investigate some ancient manuscripts and practices. Below are some of the notable highlights.

Minimalistic and Lead

First, we must look at the earliest surviving letter from ancient Greece, which was that of a worker in the northern Black Sea during fifth century B.C. The design seems to have been minimal, since the letter was written on a simple thin sheet of lead. There is no opening or closing, unlike the dramatic envelope tearing that we have today. In ancient Greece, this type of minimalism was especially strong when it came to wedding invitation letters, as epitomized by their short notices. For example, one letter simply states:

Dionysios asks you to dinner on the occasion of his children’s marriage in the house of Ischyrion – tomorrow, which is the 30th from the ninth hour.

Theon, son of Origenes, invites you to the wedding of his sister – tomorrow, which is the 9th of Tubi from the eighth hour.

Despite such simplistic designs, receiving a Save the Date seems to have mattered a great deal socially, as there was even a contemporary myth about Eris (the goddess of discord) being refused admittance to a wedding banquet because she didn’t have an invitation.

A metal spoon with melted lead.

Printed and Tinted

Believe it or not, town criers were the primary way of making wedding announcements for most during the early and high Middle Ages, since many were illiterate. (The wealthy put family crests on the letters to accommodate such guests.) In 1440, however, German goldsmith Johannes Gutenberg came up with the printing press, revolutionizing letterpress forever. (Yes, Chinese and Korean printing methods did exist, but they lacked a metal alloy that melted and cooled speedily.) This innovation enabled many Renaissance writers to publish books in the vernacular and the Protestant Reformers to make the Bible uncensored, both of which encouraged people of all socioeconomic strata to become literate. Printed works could now have color illustrations and pages with as many as 42 lines of type. With the rise of capitalism, the emerging middle class employed the mezzotint technology, which enabled engraving via pricking a metal plate with little holes designed to hold ink. To prevent smudging, a tissue paper would be placed on the engraving, a practice which is common even for wedding invitations today.

The Gutenberg press.
The Gutenberg press.

Two Revolutions Later

After the Industrial Revolution, wedding invitation design became even more specialized. Thanks to lithography, or the act of creating ink impressions via a special stone, the mass production of printed works took off. Still, the postal system wasn’t quite what it was today, which meant people had to send invitations on horseback. As precautions against inclement weather, the invitations were sealed twice; the outer envelope took the beating, preserving the integrity of the inner envelope. After the Internet revolutionized the commercial world, RSVP cards became even more personalized. Today, online retailers that specialize in stationery receive all kinds of requests for customizations.

Carrefour de St Jean et Paul (lithograph)
A 1835 lithograph in color.

Conclusion

Thanks to all the advances in wedding invitation design technology, making a card in an Art-Deco-styled format or with a thermographic typeface is not difficult today. If you’re interested in getting that perfectly styled wedding invitation, simply let Forever Friends lend a hand today!

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